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ACT II - Scene V

Venice. Before SHYLOCK'S house Enter SHYLOCK and LAUNCELOT SHYLOCK

Well, thou shalt see; thy eyes shall be thy judge, The difference of old Shylock and Bassanio.- What, Jessica!- Thou shalt not gormandize As thou hast done with me- What, Jessica!- And sleep and snore, and rend apparel out- Why, Jessica, I say!

LAUNCELOT

Why, Jessica!

SHYLOCK

Who bids thee call? I do not bid thee call.

LAUNCELOT

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ACT II - Scene III

Venice. SHYLOCK'S house Enter JESSICA and LAUNCELOT JESSICA

I am sorry thou wilt leave my father so. Our house is hell; and thou, a merry devil, Didst rob it of some taste of tediousness. But fare thee well; there is a ducat for thee; And, Launcelot, soon at supper shalt thou see Lorenzo, who is thy new master's guest. Give him this letter; do it secretly. And so farewell. I would not have my father See me in talk with thee.

LAUNCELOT

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ACT II - Scene II

Venice. A street Enter LAUNCELOT GOBBO LAUNCELOT

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ACT II - Scene I

Belmont. PORTIA'S house Flourish of cornets. Enter the PRINCE of MOROCCO, a tawny Moor all in white, and three or four FOLLOWERS accordingly, with PORTIA, NERISSA, and train PRINCE OF MOROCCO

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An Unprecendented Archive

After his monumental History of Nepali Children’s Literature, author and researcher Pramod Pradhan has just come out with The History of Nepali Essays. Alongside the basic trends in different timeframes, the work makes an orderly presentation of different phases of the development of the essay as a genre. Ambitious from all angles—dimension, scope and comprehensiveness—the History academically endorses the essay as a genre and opens doors for further research and exploration in this genre that has lagged behind in Nepali literature as compared to verses, fictions and plays.

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Hard Times for Socrates’ Footsteps

Govinda Raj Bhattarai’s masterpiece Sukaratka Paila has recently been translated into English, and published as Socrates’ Footsteps. In this sense, the content is not new, though a review of the translated version is pertinent for a few reasons. First, the author claims in foreword that the book "has been rendered into English with a view to promoting Nepali literature."

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ACT I - Scene III

Act 1, Scene 3

 

[Enter BASSANIO and SHYLOCK]

 

SHYLOCK: Three thousand ducats; well.

 

BASSANIO: Ay, sir, for three months.

 

SHYLOCK: For three months; well.

 

BASSANIO: For the which, as I told you, Antonio shall be bound.

 

SHYLOCK: Antonio shall become bound; well.     [5]

 

BASSANIO: May you stead me? will you pleasure me? shall I

know your answer?

 

SHYLOCK: Three thousand ducats for three months and Antonio bound.

 

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ACT I - Scene II

[Enter PORTIA and NERISSA]
PORTIA: By my troth, Nerissa, my little body is aweary of
this great world.
NERISSA: You would be, sweet madam, if your miseries were in
the same abundance as your good fortunes are: and
yet, for aught I see, they are as sick that surfeit     [5]
with too much as they that starve with nothing.
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ACT I - Scene I

[Enter Antonio, Solanio, and Salerio]

ANTONIO

In sooth, I know not why I am so sad: 

It wearies me; you say it wearies you; 

But how I caught it, found it, or came by it, 

What stuff ’tis made of, whereof it is born,

I am to learn; 

And such a want-wit sadness makes of me, 

That I have much ado to know myself.

 

SALERIO

Your mind is tossing on the ocean;

There, where your argosies with portly sail, 

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A. Dramatis Personae

THE DUKE OF VENICE
THE PRINCE OF MOROCCO, suitor to Portia
THE PRINCE OF ARRAGON, suitor to Portia
ANTONIO, a merchant of Venice
BASSANIO, his friend, suitor to Portia

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