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ACT II - Scene II

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Capulet's orchard.

Enter Romeo.

ROMEO

He jests at scars that never felt a wound.

Enter Juliet above at a window.

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ACT I - Scene II

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A Street.

Enter Capulet, County Paris, and [Servant] -the Clown.

CAPULET

But Montague is bound as well as I,
In penalty alike;
and 'tis not hard, I think,
For men so old as we to keep the peace.

PARIS

Of honourable reckoning are you both,
And pity 'tis you liv'd at odds so long.
But now, my lord, what say you to my suit?

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ACT I - Scene I

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Verona. A public place.

Enter Sampson and Gregory (with swords and bucklers) of the house
of Capulet.

SAMPSON

Gregory, on my word, we'll not carry coals.

GREGORY

No, for then we should be colliers.

SAMPSON

I mean, an we be in choler, we'll draw.

GREGORY

Ay, while you live, draw your neck out of collar.

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ACT I - Prologue

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Enter Chorus.

CHORUS

Two households, both alike in dignity,
In fair Verona, where we lay our scene,
From ancient grudge break to new mutiny,
Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean.
From forth the fatal loins of these two foes
A pair of star-cross'd lovers take their life;

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A. Dramatis Personae

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Chorus.

Escalus, Prince of Verona.
Paris, a young Count, kinsman to the Prince.
Montague, heads of two houses at variance with each other.
Capulet, heads of two houses at variance with each other.
An old Man, of the Capulet family.
Romeo, son to Montague.
Tybalt, nephew to Lady Capulet.
Mercutio, kinsman to the Prince and friend to Romeo.
Benvolio, nephew to Montague, and friend to Romeo
Tybalt, nephew to Lady Capulet.
Friar Laurence, Franciscan.
Friar John, Franciscan.

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Romeo and Juliet / Shakespeare

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Romeo and Juliet is a tragedy written early in the career of playwright William Shakespeare about two young "star-cross'd lovers" whose deaths ultimately unite their feuding families. It was among Shakespeare's most popular plays during his lifetime and, along with Hamlet and Macbeth, is one of his most frequently performed plays. Today, the title characters are regarded as archetypal young lovers.

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ACT V - Scene I

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Belmont. The garden before PORTIA'S house Enter LORENZO and JESSICA. LORENZO

The moon shines bright. In such a night as this, When the sweet wind did gently kiss the trees, And they did make no noise--in such a night, Troilus methinks mounted the Troyan walls, And sigh'd his soul toward the Grecian tents, Where Cressid lay that night.

JESSICA

In such a night Did Thisby fearfully o'ertrip the dew, And saw the lion's shadow ere himself, And ran dismayed away.

LORENZO

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ACT IV - Scene II

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Venice. A street Enter PORTIA and NERISSA PORTIA

Inquire the Jew's house out, give him this deed, And let him sign it; we'll away tonight, And be a day before our husbands home. This deed will be well welcome to Lorenzo. Enter GRATIANO

GRATIANO

Fair sir, you are well o'erta'en. My Lord Bassanio, upon more advice, Hath sent you here this ring, and doth entreat Your company at dinner.

PORTIA

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ACT IV - Scene I

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Venice. The court of justice Enter the DUKE, the MAGNIFICOES, ANTONIO, BASSANIO, GRATIANO, SALERIO, and OTHERS DUKE OF VENICE

What, is Antonio here?

ANTONIO

Ready, so please your Grace.

DUKE OF VENICE

I am sorry for thee; thou art come to answer A stony adversary, an inhuman wretch, Uncapable of pity, void and empty From any dram of mercy.

ANTONIO

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ACT III - Scene V

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Belmont. The garden Enter LAUNCELOT and JESSICA LAUNCELOT

Yes, truly; for, look you, the sins of the father are to be laid upon the children; therefore, I promise you, I fear you. I was always plain with you, and so now I speak my agitation of the matter; therefore be o' good cheer, for truly I think you are damn'd. There is but one hope in it that can do you any good, and that is but a kind of bastard hope, neither.

JESSICA

And what hope is that, I pray thee?

LAUNCELOT

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